RACHEL ANNA BROWN
RACHEL ANNA BROWN

Induced Shock: Treating depression with electroconvulsive therapy

By Rachel Brown

Photos by Jared Chang

In a gray, windowless room, the ragged lines of an encephalograph rise and fall in amplitude, dancing to the brainwaves of the patient having a seizure on a stretcher in the middle of the room. Bellingham psychiatrist Dr. Henry Levine glances at the vital signs on the EKG machine to check if the patient is receiving the right amount of electrical currents. This is one of the hundreds of Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT) treatments he has administered.

ECT, formerly known as electroshock therapy, is a treatment for severe depression that sends an electric current of 800 milliamps from the top of the head to the right temple, causing the patient to seize, former ECT nurse Charles Shoecraft says. Eight hundred milliamps is about one-fifth of what defibrillators use to start human hearts, Levine says.

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Trashing Technology: Electronic waste impact increases

Story by Rachel Brown

Photo illustration by Paul Bikis

Clear shrink wrap in hand, Inventory inspector Gordon Turman tightly binds more than 100 Apple computer monitors to wooden pallets in the Armory on State Street. He wipes the sweat of his forehead and begins to load three 30-foot tractor trailers full of 22 wooden pallets containing monitors to be recycled.

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BELLINGHAM ALIVE MAGAZINE

 

Bellingham Tap Trail

Story and photos by Rachel Brown

Hold on Bellinghamsters, an entirely new way to enjoy beer is a-brewing. Those who thought they knew their way around Bellingham’s beer scene will have to start with a blank slate. From Boundary Bay to Chuckanut Brewery, four Bellingham residents have created the Bellingham Tap Trail — a beer map — as a way for beer-lovers everywhere to navigate the breweries of Bellingham.

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Wonder Woman Aimee Frazier

Story and photos by Rachel Brown

It starts with a sense of wonder and curiosity. Aimee Frazier opens the door to her deck and walks out into the wilderness. This is her place. She loves the outdoors, and has dedicated her life to encourage the same sense of wonder and curiosity in others.

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Bellingham's New Foundry

Story and photos by Rachel Brown

In 1983, an industrial engineer named Chuck Hull was trying to create a way to harden tabletop material using ultraviolet light. In doing so, he created the first 3-dimensionally printed object. Surgeon Anthony Atala took the stage at the annual TED conference in 2011 and printed a human kidney on stage using a 3-D printer. Last year, Wired (among other news outlets) reported that guns could be printed on 3-D printers, sparking a new debate in gun control. There are now 3-D printed cars, shoes, houses and even human skin. Recently in England, technicians printed the first 3-D hamburger, touching off an interesting conversation about food production, manufacturing and supply. 

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